Wealth – and Teal for Startups

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The observations and opinions offered here relate to three key ideas: The Internet is having some deeply disruptive influences on “how we usually do things” because individuals and organisations are having to adjust to life in an increasingly inter-connected world For many of us what we do as our “paid work” (i.e. in our “sold”… Read more »

#Dadamac and “The Death of International Development” by Jason Hickel

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Dadamac operates from a place outside the established International Development community, so the perspective I have tends to be disconnected from “normal” (large NGO) approaches. For this reason I welcome an article  on The Death of International Development  by Jason Hickel, who is an anthropologist at the London School of Economics. His emphasis is different… Read more »

Language and thought – this time “growth” and “development”

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Language and thought are closely connected, and we struggle to wordify what we are thinking in ways that others will understand.  Words with the meaning sucked out illustrated this problem with the example of “co-design”. This post, where Eric Michael Johnson interviews Fritjof Capra, illustrates the problem again, this time with “growth” and “development” (my… Read more »

Words with the meaning sucked out

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Thanks to Sean McDougall for this explanation of something I’ve often experienced, but couldn’t wordify. It happens repeatedly in innovative areas of my life  – i.e. the way that useful words get the meaning sucked out. His example is co-design: Co-design, it seemed to us, created opportunities for designers to push suppliers and consumers to… Read more »

George Por, a community knowledge garden and Dadamac UK-Africa

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This post by George Por (with my italics) provides context for ideas I’m exploring through Dadamac’s UK-Africa work regarding: the creation of an information commons preparing for organisational growth as a Teal organisation the relevance of pattern language Enlivening Edge – Introduction to the January 2016 Issue (snip) Learning innovation We would like to develop, in… Read more »

Living A Mindful Life – By: Kiara Jewel Lingo

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I like this practical explanation of mindfulness in “normal daily life” Living A Mindful Life – By Kiara Jewel Lingo: I am so grateful for the practice of mindfulness! Over and over I find that I don’t know how much I need to stop until I stop. In the midst of all the busyness of… Read more »

Deep concerns related to unskilled volunteerism

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My unusual vantage point regarding UK-Africa connections and collaborations has caused me to be have some deep concerns related to unskilled volunteerism (I acknowledge the value of skilled volunteers). The articles below, with my italics, illustrate some of the issues. The source is The Guardian Global Development Professionals Network A space for NGOs, aid workers… Read more »

#Dadamac – Maina Kiai – and “need to change our thinking”

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Excerpt from a post in the Guardian Global Development Professionals Network  – We are living in an age of protest  by Maina Kiai (UN special rapporteur on the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly and of association). I’ve italicised where it is relevant to my interests in International Development issues and the effective use of… Read more »

From – Owning Is the New Sharing – by Nathan Schneider

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Related to my interest in learning-and-earning in a disrupted, Internet-based world, and new models of organisations and ownership. From –Owning Is the New Sharing – by Nathan Schneider with my italics. (snip) The resurgent co-op model The worker cooperative is an old model that’s attracting new interest among the swelling precariat masses — youthful and… Read more »